Unusual Name.

Tags

, , , , ,

It’s bound to happen. As we start to delve into our family histories we come across a name that makes our modern eyes widen and our mind do gymnastics trying to figure it out. If we’re lucky, we knew this person, or at least of them, and may have a headstart on the pronunciation at the very least, or we may not have known them by that name at all, and that may make a lot of sense all of the sudden.

Naming children, in my own experience, can be a difficult journey. There are so many factors that can go into it. For our children, Scott and I had a list of things we wanted to keep in mind:

  • Could not start with R, or end in -er
  • Easy to pronounce, unlike our last name
  • Unique enough to not have to be called “Child R” in school, see above
  • It should pass the grandma/grandpa test – can we imagine said child to easily carry the name through the various stages of life: child, adult, grandparent?

I can barely imagine what the process might have been like for my ancestors without the plethora of resources I had at my literal fingertips via the internet and the countless baby name books available to me in 2007, 2011, and 2013. So when we come across a name that is not only unusual to our modern eyes and ears but is also so unique that a quick google search only brings up mentions of this one individual who existed in time… wow. Such is the case with one of my ancestors, my third great grandmother, Algephia.

First of all, how in the world is this name pronounced? Is it a hard g like golf? Or a soft g like gel? Looking at general rules of English, which of course means there’s a lot of times those rules are not followed, a g followed by an e, its sound is soft, like the word generous.

Al-ge-phia  | \ˈal-jə-fē-ə\

Algephia Ann Cagg was born 18 June 1852 in York Township, Athens County, Ohio to Andrew C Cagg and Julia Ann Risley. Andrew and Julia, married 24 April 1851 in Athens County, and had both been married previously. Algephia was their first child together. She was Andrew’s first known child and Julia’s fifth. Andrew and Julia would go on to have at least four more children before Andrew’s unfortunate death in 1865.

When there is such an unusual name in the family, it seems natural to look at other names in that family. Is there a pattern? Are there other names that stick out? Let’s look at Andrew’s family members:

  • Grandparents: Sebastion “Boston” Cagg, Maria Roof, George Miller, Hannah Stackhouse
  • Aunts/Uncles: Solomon, Boston, Jacob, Elizabeth, Maryann, Polly, Hannah, Solomon, Cynthia Ann, Frederick, Margaret, Mary Ann, Roanna
  • Parents: John Cagg, Barbary Miller
  • Siblings: Henry, Samuel, John, Sarah Ann, Cassandra, Mary, Isaac Wesley
  • Wives: Mary Annace Bobo, Julia Ann Risley

Nothing too crazy here. Biblical names, popular names of the times. The lone standout, Boston, I believe to be a shortening of Sebastian, with some alteration. Andrew’s grandfather, Boston Kagg’s will alone uses three versions of his name: Boston, Bastian, and Baltzer. Nothing to point towards the unusual name of Algephia.

Julia’s family:

  • Grandparents: Richard Risley, Naomi [unknown], maternal grandparents are currently unknown
  • Aunts/Uncles: Richard, Naomi, Susannah, Eli, Rebecca, Jesse, Solomon, possible maternal uncles – John and Lewis
  • Parents:
  • Siblings: James, Samuel, Reason Oliver
  • Husbands: Harry Henshaw, Andrew Cagg

Again nothing remotely similar to Algephia. Reason is a bit odd to me, especially for a male child, Oliver was his mother’s maiden surname. Often these types of puritanical names, like Honesty and Patience, tend to lend themselves more toward females. So we know that Algephia was not likely a nod to a family member. Though, she did have a niece named after her, thanks to her half-brother Morris Henshaw.

Have you ever heard this unusual name before or know where her parents might have learned it from? I may never know where the name Algephia comes from, but I do know, she most often went by her middle name Ann, or Anna. I can’t really blame her.

This is the 3rd prompt for the 2019 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks series by genealogist and author, Amy Johnson Crow.

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.
Advertisements

Challenges.

Tags

, , , ,

Week two of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I´m writing a second post. I will take all of the small victories.

This weeks’ prompt is ¨Challenges¨ and I have had several ideas churning in my head all week, but one seems to have pushed itself forward. It’s a story involving a broken family, rumors, mystery, and possibly even murder. The challenge is in trying to solve the tragedy of a nearly 100-year-old event that saw a family forever altered.

My great great grandfather Herschel Joshua Wooley was born 10 September 1892 in Sand Run a part of Ward Township, Hocking County, Ohio to coal miner Richard Wooley and his wife Ida Florence Dailey. Herschel was the fourth child of the couple’s five known children.

As is often the case, Herschel became a coal miner like his father. In the 1910 census record of his parents’ household, Herschel is 17 and already employed in the mines. Herschel was 23 years old when he married 17-year-old Helen Rife on 12 June 1916 in the neighboring county of Athens, where Helen’s family lived. Herschel and Helen had four known children between 1917 and 1923: Elza Leo (20 Oct 1917), Venus Margaret (22 Apr 1920), Verna Lacey (23 Apr 1921), and Robert E (1 Dec 1923). Verna Lacey Wooley was my great grandmother.

Now let’s set the stage. In October 1924, the Wooleys were a young family of six, living in the rural area outside of Ward Township, Hocking County, Ohio. Herschel was 32 and had been working for the Haydenville plant of NATCO. Helen, who would turn 25 on the 25th of October, was at home caring for four children ages 7, 4, 3, and 10 months. At some point prior to the evening of Sunday, October 12th, Helen had undergone a surgery of unknown purpose in Columbus and was recuperating at the home of her parents in Buchtel. The children were staying with her and her parents as well.

On the night of 12 October 1924, a tragedy would occur that would alter not just the lives of the young Wooley family of six, but also the lives of their extended families, and create ripples that affected the lives of their descendants.

To tell the story of that night I have had to rely on contemporary newspaper articles over a four year period of time, 1924 to 1928. That in and of itself is quite the challenge, especially when it comes to copyright laws. Due to those laws, the articles I have found cannot be reproduced in full here, but I will do my best to tell the tale as written in these articles.

The Athens Messenger, Athens, Ohio, Monday 13 Oct 1924, page 1, Column 6 and 7. Newspaperarchive.com, accessed 15 Jan 2019.

On Sunday 12 October 1924 Herschel had been visiting his wife and children in Buchtel. He had just started a new job at the Logan Pottery the week before, and so he left Buchtel around 8 pm Sunday evening to walk to Logan so that he was ready for work on Monday. Without knowing exact addresses or having a contemporary map of the area, Google Maps tells me that there a few walking options from Buchtel to Logan, with mileage ranging from 13 to 17 miles. Let’s assume that he could walk a mile in 15 minutes, or about 4 miles per hour.
(You weren’t expecting to have to do math, were you?) 
Let’s go with the upper end of the mileage, and say that it should take him around four hours to make the trek, putting him into Logan around midnight. His exact destination is likely lost to time, but we do know he didn’t arrive at that final destination in Logan.

Around 1 am Monday 13 October 1924, Herschel was found about 200 yards west of the Union Furnace Rd (which I believe to be currently known as OH-328) off of the Logan-Nelsonville Pike (old US33) lying unconscious in a pool of blood, with glass shards around him. According to the newspaper accounts, a man by the name of Will T Matthews and three unnamed companions discovered Herschel and took him to Cherrington Hospital in Logan, Herschel had received multiple skull fractures, and the prognosis was very grim.

Herschel remained in the hospital without regaining consciousness. Surgery was considered far too risky, until Monday 20 October, a week after he was found on that dark roadside. During his hospital stay, a bad bruise was observed on his right leg, leading to a theory that Herschel was hit by a machine and thrown headfirst onto a windshield. Decompression surgery was performed as a last resort to try to save him. The surgery was temporarily successful, in that Herschel regained consciousness for a short time. even recognizing an unnamed brother, making “rational remarks” but had no answer for the event that caused him to be so injured. The descriptions of his multiple injuries and this attempt to save Herschel’s life were provided in an article from The Logan Democrat Sentinel on Thursday, 23 Oct 1924 which I found digitized on the subscription site NewspaperArchive.com. Unfortunately, the title of that article is “H.W. Wooley Dies At Hospital On Wednesday.” Herschel Wooley, 35, succumbed to his injuries on 22 Oct 1924, nine days after he was found in a pool of his own blood and shattered glass.

The challenge has only just begun though. What happened that night? A tragic accident? A hit and run? Or something more nefarious perhaps? Only one rumor made it down through my branch of the family, which hints at the latter, but will newspaper articles solve the mystery, or only deepen it?

Contemporary newspaper articles I was able to find detailing Herschel’s tragedy are as follows:

  • Webb, Clinton. “Mystery Surrounds Finding of Injured Man Near Logan: Herschel Wooley, 35, Discovered Lying in Road With Cracked Skull Early Monday Morning.” The Athens Messenger. October 13, 1924, p.1.
  • The Logan Democrat Sentinel. “Mystery Surrounding Accident of Mr. Wooley: Found Unconscious Monday Morning.” October 16, 1924, p. 1.
  • The Athens Messenger. “Herschel Wooley Goes Under Knife.” October 21, 1924, p. 3.
  • The Logan Democrat Sentinel. “H.W. Wooley Dies at Hospital on Wednesday.” October 23, 1924, p.1, 8.

Firsts.

Tags

, , ,

Its a new year. That time when much of the world seems to want to try something new or to do something “better” or with more confidence. So here I am, joining the many, and hoping to (finally) finish a goal, create a new habit, and to become more confident in my blogging, researching, and storytelling.

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

I am determined to continue this goal of blogging about my kids’ ancestors, with much of the inspiration coming from Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks blog prompts. So here is my contribution to “First.”


I think I’ve always had an interest in my unknown family. My parents divorced when I was three and my brother was two. Aside from that natural rift in that whole “nuclear family” deal, it wasn’t any better outside of that circle. But that’s a story for another day.

My first step into digging up roots was in high school. My mom and I grasping for any hope of scholarships as college loomed ahead of me.

You know where this is heading, right? I’m cringing already.

The Cherokee Princess.

There. I said it. It’s out there. Of course I know now, and have for many years, that that is one of the most ridiculous things in the realm of American family history, right up there with “the family name was changed at Ellis Island.”

Regardless, that’s where it all started for me. It was my maternal grandmother who mentioned it. Literally, just a “well, there was supposedly a Cherokee Princess way back in the family.” So, that’s all that we had to go on: someone in my maternal grandmother’s lineage. My mom showed me how to work a microfilm reader at the Lucas County Public Library in downtown Toledo, Ohio. We weren’t very successful, and not just because of the lack of finding a certain princess. We only made it back to my Second Great Grandfather, Howard Cook DeWitt, 1881-1957. It was the late 1990s and while the internet certainly existed, I had not yet discovered the genealogical corner, so to speak.

It wasn’t a pretty start, but it sparked the interest that really took off about a decade later. Now, here I am, another decade later, and I found her.

She’s not Cherokee. She’s most definitely not a princess. She isn’t named, and sadly I may never know that name, but I have a nearly 214-year-old hint that she is there, just beyond. She would be my Sixth Great Grandmother.

The hint was thrown into a baptismal record of a couple’s sixth known child. That couple was my fifth great-grandparents: Joseph Chamberland and Josephine/Josette Secnix/LaRose. Josephine, as I’ll call her, is a bit of a mystery herself, but that’s a blog post of its own. Was there something going on in the area at the time of that child’s birth, April 1805, that would prompt the priest to note that the mother, Josephine (though unnamed in the entry), was a “fille d’une Sauvagesse” or “daughter of a wild woman/Native American?”

[Ancestry.com, Drouin Collection, D, Détroit, Ste-Anne,
Autre Registres, 1801-1810, Image 25]

Above is a screenshot of the baptismal record of Joseph Chamberland, born 1 April 1805 to Joseph Chamberland and the (unnamed?) “et de ?? fille d’une Sauvagesse.” He was baptized on 3 April 1805 at Ste. Anne de Detroit by Father Gabriel Richard. Robert Navarre and Therese Bondy stood as godparents. The same priest baptized the couple’s fifth known child in 1803, a year after he took on the role at Ste Anne’s, but while the mother is named, Josette S(t?), there is no hint to her possible lineage. The couple had at least three more children that were found in the baptismal records, according to other researchers, and that tantalizing hint is never mentioned again.

I’ll likely never know if this unnamed woman is the person my grandmother may have somehow heard about in her lineage, or where the rumor came from for her family. But as with many tales of family lore, there is often a hint of truth in every story. The task then becomes finding out how much truth can be found.

What do you think? With this small amount of information, do you think I’m heading in the right direction? That Josephine/Josette, wife of Joseph Chamberland, was at least part Native American? What steps should I consider in fleshing out this hint on what was my first genealogical search?

NOTE: I do not speak French, but with thanks to Google Translate and a very helpful podcast and accompanying blog, this is my translation. Any errors are my own, and I would greatly appreciate the help if I got it wrong! Be sure to check out Maple Stars and Stripes if you have French Canadian roots! You’ll hear about the history, culture, language, and so much more from some truly fantastic stories and interviews!

Speaking Names: Monroe County, (West) Virginia Will Book Vol II, 1819-1829

Tags

, ,

In a previous post, Speaking Names. The Slave Name Roll Project, I talked about an initiative to try to give researchers and descendants of slave ancestors hope to bridge the 1870 gap. It is called the Slave Name Roll Project, started by Schalene Jennings Dagutis at Tangled Roots and Trees. This is my second post to the Project.

The second volume of the Monroe County Will Books formally spans the years 1819-1829, but as with the litigious society of today, there are often carryovers from preceding years, so I will point out when previous and subsequent volumes should be referenced as I reach them, and will update as necessary.

**Please note that I have provided below any names as I see them written, and indicated the gender and or age as these people were described (for example: Woman, Wench, Girl, Child, Man, Boy). I have also noted to whom they were bequeathed to if specified for the purpose of further tracking. Unless otherwise noted, the following people were described as slaves or negroes.

West Virginia Will Books, Monroe, Volume II, 1819-1829, by order of the Estate holder:

ALEXANDER, James – (Will in Vol I, see previous entry) Estate Appraisals of the Legacies left to wife and two sons, Mathew and Henry, all dated 7 Sep 1814, but not dated as to appearance in court, pages 12-14.
– Patience, Woman, as part of the Legacy of Isabella Alexander, widow, pg 14
– Mary, Girl, as part of the Legacy of Isabella Alexander, widow, pg 14. Mary is known by the Will of James Alexander to be the child of Patience.
– Calm, Man, as part of the Legacy of Mathew Alexander, pg 14
– Sealy, 2 year old Girl, the Legacy of Henry Alexander, pg 14. Sealy is very likely to be the Cicilia, second child of Patience, from the will, as Cicilia was willed to Henry Alexander.

ALEXANDER, Mathew – Will dated 28 Apr 1825, recorded in Monroe County Court Aug 1825, pages 301-302.
– “4thly, I give to my wife Jane Alexander all my Negroes with their Increase forever” pg 302
Estate Appraisal – dated 26 Aug 1825, recorded Oct 1828, pages 478-480.
– Cush (?), Mulatto, no gender specified, pg 480
– Bet, Girl, pg 480
– Dinah, Woman, pg 480

BLACK, William – Estate Appraisal dated 2 May 1822, recorded 21 May 1822, pages 123-124.
– Rachel, Girl, 22 years old, pg 124
– Betty, Girl, 23 years old, pg 124
– Rachel, Girl, 2 years old, pg 124
– Hamilton, Boy, 3 years old, pg 124
– Jack, Boy, 2 years old, pg 124

BOWYER, Adam – Estate Sale dated 22 Aug 1815, recorded May 1825, pages 273-275. Adam Bowyer’s Estate Appraisal is listed in Vol I, and names 3 female slaves, Charlotte, Sally, and Dolly, so the following unnamed women are possibly Charlotte and Sally.
unnamed, Woman, hired out to Charles Friend for one year, pg 275
unnamed, Woman, hired out for a period of five years by Christian Bowyer, Administrator of the Estate, pg 275
Estate Settlement of Adam Bowyer, at the death of his Christina Bowyer, dated 17 Jan 1829, recorded Mar 1829, pages 442-443.
– Dolly, Girl, hired out for 4 years, pg 442
– Andrew, Boy, hired out, pg 442
unnamed, Boy, “Credit… By Raising a negro boy Two years 20.00” pg 442

BOWYER, Christina – Estate Sale dated 20 Jun 1828, recorded Jun 1829, pages 458-463.
– unnamed, Girl, hired out for 1 year to Michael Erskine, pg 460 (Dolly?)
– unnamed, Boy, hired out for 1 year to Michael Erskine, pg 460 (Andrew?)
– unnamed, Small Boy, hired out for 1 year to Anderson A Lewallen, pg 461

BYRNSIDE, John – Estate Settlement not dated, recorded 22 Nov 1821 and settled 15 Jan 1822, pages 102-108. An unspecified number of slaves were hired by Isaac (son of John) and Elizabeth Byrnside, John’s widow on page 102, spanning the years 1817-1821. I’ll be honest in that I’m not entirely sure what this section is telling us. John Byrnside’s will can be found in Vol I, and the names all match up between the will and estate settlement, with only the addition of Charlotte/Shorlot’s child. As there were 7 Legatees of John Byrnside (widow and 6 children), and 7 slaves (and 1 child not separated from its mother) in his possession, the Court assigned values to each slave and had the Legatees each drew lots to determine which slave they received.
– Nelly, 21 years old, to Elizabeth Byrnside, widow, pg 106
– Billy, 30 years old, to Andw Alexander on behalf of his wife Jane, formerly Jane Byrnside, pg 106
– Shorlot (Charlotte?), 19(?) years old, to Thomas Edgar for his wife Elisa, formerly Elisa Byrnside, pg 106
– unnamed, child of Shorlot, to Thomas Edgar for his wife Elisa, formerly Elisa Byrnside, pg 106
– Bob, about 28 years old, to Isaac Byrnside, pg 106
– Mat, about 44 years old, to Julyann Byrnside by her guardian Mathew Alexander, pg 106
– James, about 28 years old, to John Byrnside by his guardian Mathew Alexander, pg 106
– Jack, about 9 years old, to James Byrnside by his guardian Mathew Alexander, pg 106
Guardianship Report by Mathew Alexander, guardian of Julyann, John, and James Byrnside, children of John Byrdnside, dated 9 Feb 1822, recorded 19 Feb 1822, pages 109-110.
– Jim (James), Man, owned by John Byrnside, hired out by his guardian Mathew Alexander, to Elizabeth Byrnside from 25 Jun 1821-31 Dec 1822. Slaves were hired off to highest bidder at Union on 1 Jan 1822, pg 109
– Jack, Small Boy, owned by Jack Byrnside, hired out by his guardian Mathew Alexander, to Elizabeth Byrnside from 25 Jun 1821-31 Dec 1822. Slaves were hired off to highest bidder at Union on 1 Jan 1822, pg 109
– Matt, Man, owned by Julian Byrnside, hired out by her guardian Mathew Alexander, to Elizabeth Byrnside from 25 Jun 1821-31 Dec 1822. Slaves were hired off to highest bidder at Union on 1 Jan 1822, pg 109

CAPERTON, Hugh Sr – Estate Inventory dated 1 Oct 1816, recorded 14 Jan 1819, pages 19-21.
– Tye, Man, pg 19
Estate Sale dated 14 Nov 1816, recorded on an unknown date, pages 22-23.
– Tye, Man, purchased by Henry Erskine, pg 22.

CROW, James – Will dated 1 Mar 1821, recorded in Court 20 Mar 1821, pages 94-95. Note the possible family units either being created or maintained.
– Chloe, Girl, to daughter Fanny Brown, pg 94
– Old Jim, no age or gender specified, to daughter Jane Brown, already in her possession, pg 94
– Mary, no age or gender specified, to daughter Jane Brown, already in her possession, pg 94
– unnamed, Child of Mary, to daughter Jane Brown, already in her possession, pg 94
Franky, Woman, to daughter Polly Mills, pg 94
– Frank, Boy, to the children of daughter Nancy Shields (deceased), pg 94
– Isaac, Boy, to the children of daughter Nancy Shields (deceased), pg 94
– Lewis, Man, to son John Crow, pg 94
– Moriah, wife of Lewis, to son John Crow, pg 94
– Sally, Child of Moriah, to son John Crow, pg 94
– Joe, Man, to son Joseph Crow, pg 4
– Beck, Woman, to son Joseph Crow, pg 94
– Agga, Beck’s Child, to son Joseph Crow, pg 94

EWING, Oliver – Will dated 17 Jan 1818, brought to court in Jun 1823 with one subscribing witness, continued for further proof, a second appeared in court Oct 1823, pages 198-199.
– Moses, Boy, to nephew Oliver Ewing, son of brother Samuel Ewing, pg 198
– Wilson, Boy, to nephew Oliver Ewing, son of brother Samuel Ewing, pg 198
– Seel, Girl, to niece Sidney Ewing, daughter of brother Samuel Ewing, pg 198
– Lucy, Woman, to Fanny Ewing, daughter of brother Joseph Ewing, pg 198
– Winney, Girl, to Gean Charlton, daughter of sister Fanny Ewing, pg 198
Estate Appraisal dated 7 Nov 1823, recorded Dec 1823, page 208. Mentioned in will (dated 17 Jan 1818) but not appraised: Wilson and Seel.
– Lucy, Girl, about 37 years old, pg 208
– Moses, Man, about 33 years old, pg 208
– Winney, Girl, about 17 years old, pg 208

FLESHMAN, Michael – Estate Appraisal, not dated, recorded in court Jan 1828, pages 362-363.
– unnamed, Girl, pg 363, not mentioned in Will, Vol II page 335, also not mentioned in Estate Sale, pgs 387-388

GRAHAM, David – Estate Appraisal dated 2 Dec 1818, recorded in Court 16 Sep 1823, pages 189-191.
– Joseph, Boy, pg 191
– Fillis, Woman, pg 191
– Alice (?), Girl, pg 191
Milly, Girl, pg 191
Ellen, Girl, pg 191
Luden (?), mall Boy, pg 191
Estate Sale dated 4 Dec 1818, recorded in Court 16 Sep 1823, pages 192-193. It may be possible to at least guess as to which individuals were sold to whom based on their appraisal values and the amount that the purchasers paid, though the amounts paid might suggest purchase on credit or somesuch deal as the amounts are about 10% of the appraised values. One boy is unaccounted for per the Sale.
– unnamed, Girl, purchased by William Clark
unnamed, Girl, purchased by William Clark
– unnamed, Boy, purchased by William Graham
– unnamed, Girl, purchased by widow Polly Graham
– unnamed, Girl, purchased by widow Polly Graham

GRAHAM, Florence – Widow of James Graham (Vol I). Her will is dated 25 Mar 1824, recorded in Court Dec 1824, pages 250-251. Cleary, a slave also left to James’ widow Florence, is not included in any of Florence’s records in this Volume, despite being willed to her.
– Rose, Woman, to daughter Jane Garrett, pg 250
Estate Appraisal dated Dec 1824, recorded in Court Jun 1825, pages 285-290.
– Rose, Old Woman, pg 286
Estate Account dated 30 Nov 1826, recorded in Court Dec 1826, pages 373-375.
– Rose, Old Woman, pg 373, receipt to daughter Jane Garrads, pg 374

GRAHAM, James – Will listed in Volume I. Additional Estate Appraisal not dated, but recorded in Court Dec 1825, page 320.
– Clary, Woman, pg 320, there being two Clary/Cleary in the will (one listed as a Sr), it is unclear as to which this may be, but likely the younger Cleary as she was willed to his wife Florence, and then to be sold after his wife’s death. Cleary Sr was willed to his daughter Elizabeth Stodghill.
– Rachael, Child, pg 320, not mentioned in James Graham’s Will.

GRAHAM, Samuel – Estate Appraisal dated 19 Jun 1819, recorded Jun 1824, pages 221-222.
unnamed, Boy, pg 222 This is possibly the boy named Ceasar who was bequeathed to James Graham’s son Samuel “never to be sold nor ever taken from his family during his life” from James Graham’s Will.

GRAY, John – Estate Appraisal dated 25 Feb 1822, recorded in Court 19 Mar 1822, pages 117-119.
– Lymus, Man, about 45 years old, pg 117
Estate Sale dated 27 Feb 1822, recorded 19 Mar 1822, pages 120-123.
– Lymus, Man about 46 years old, purchased by John Wiley, pg 120

HARVEY, Nicholas – Will dated 8 Oct 1825, recorded in Court Dec 1826, pages 360-361.
– Moses, Boy, to son John Harvey, pg 361
– Nancy, Girl, to son James Harvey, pg 361
Estate Appraisal dated 22 Dec 1826, recorded Dec 1826, pages 349-353. Based on this Inventory, Nicholas Harvey may have been running an inn, or similar public house, per the will it was likely in the Red Sulphur Springs area.
– Moses, Boy, pg 351
– Nancy, Girl, pg 351

HAYNES, William – Will dated 6 Aug 1819, recorded in Court May 1819, pages 2-5, then a codicil attached pages 5-6.
– Minta, Woman about 25 years old, to only daughter Agness Davidson Erskine, wife of Michael Erskine, pg 2
– Harry, Mulatto Man about 30 years old, to son James Madison Haynes, pg 3
– Gilbert, Boy about 3 years old, son of Minta, to son James Madison Haynes, pg 3
Jim, Man about 21 years old, to son Andrew Shanklin Haynes, pg 3
– Bob, Man, married to Betsy, to son William Powel Haynes, pg 3
– Betsy, Woman, married to Bob, to son William Powel Haynes, pg 3
– Sam, Boy about 5 1/2 years old, to son Thomas Neilson Haynes, pg 3
– Jinny, Mulatto Girl, born 29 Dec 1808 to Minta, “shall have her freedom when she arrives at the age of eighteen years old provided the same can be obtained agreeable to the Laws of this state and it is my will that my daughter Agness Davidson Erskine shall take the said Girl at my Death into her possession and have the full control & Benefit of her services until she obtains her freedom agreeable to Law as aforesaid and I require that not any of my legal Representatives will oppose her emancipation,” pg 4
The Codicil immediately following the Will swaps the ownership of Bob and Betsy from William Powel Haynes to Andrew Shanklin Haynes, and gives Jim to William Powel Haynes instead of Andrew Shanklin Haynes.
**There is some additional information on this family, and their slaves available in the book The History of Summers County from the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time by James H. Miller**

JOHNSON, Thomas – Will dated 16 Mar 1819, recorded in Court Jan 1826, page 322.
Edmund, no age or gender specified, to daughter Peggy Johnson
Sall, no age or gender specified, to daughter Peggy Johnson
unnamed – child of Sall, to daughter Peggy Johnson
Estate Appraisal not dated, recorded Jun 1827, pages 398-399.
Edmond, Boy, named in Will, p 398
Sall, Girl, named in Will, p 398
Dilse (?), Small Girl, p 398
Wilson, Boy, p 398
Albert, Boy, p 398
Viney, Small Girl, p 398
Estate Sale dated 1826, recorded Mar 1828, pages 400-401. The individuals sold at the Estate Sale were not named specifically. We know that Edmund, Sall, and an unnamed child of Sall were to be taken in by Peggy Johnson, but it is currently unknown which of the four named slaves from the Estate Appraisal is that unnamed child of Sall.
unnamed, purchased by Richard Johnson, p 400
unnamed, purchased by Geo Beirne (?), p 400
unnamed, purchased by Isaac Wist, p 400

MAY, Pierce W Estate Appraisal dated 6 Dec 1822, recorded in the Court in Mar 1824, p 215. None of the mentioned slaves were sold in the Dec 1822 Estate Sale on page 344 of Vol II. Under the accounts of Joseph Alderson, Adminstrator of the estate of Pierce W. Mays, the hire of 3 Negroes in 1824, and 2 in 1825 per page 356 in Vol II. The Estate Settlement was written 16 Oct 1829, and recorded in the Oct 1829 Court, page 498, no names listed.
Betty,  Woman, p 215
Sophy, Woman, p 215
Jinny, Woman, p 215
unnamed, Child of Jinny, p 215
Jordan (?), Boy, p 215
Sam, Boy 2 years old, p 215 
Sally, Child, p 215

McDANIEL, Henry Sr Will written 1 Apr 1819, recorded in Court Jun 1819, page 7.
unnamed, unspecified number or ages, to wife Caty, then to son Isack after her death, all but one to be chosen by daughter Peggy to never be sold in her lifetime without her consent. 
Estate Appraisal written 24 Jun 1819, recorded in Court 17 Nov 1819, page 38.
Winney, Woman, p 38
Svady, Girl, p 38
Clony. Girl, p 38
Rachael, Girl, p 38

NEWMAN, Jonathan Estate Appraisal completed 28 Aug 1817, recorded in Jan 1825 Court, pages 258-259.
Shed, Boy, about 8 years old, p 258
Charlotte, Girl, about 14 years old, p 258

 Nickell, John Estate Appraisal ordered Dec 1825, and recorded in Court Jun 1829, pages 455-457.
Edwin, Boy, page 456

Nickell, Margaret Will written 24 Nov 1825, recorded in Court Dec 1825, page 317.
Dulce, Woman, to nephew William Patton [possibly the same woman called Dilse/Disse in the will and estate appraisal of Robert Nickell Vol I,1813 & 1816], p 317
Emily, Child of Dulce, to nephew William Patton ” till she comes to the age of twenty one years which time I allow her to be set free if the Laws of Virginia will admit if not she is to remain the property of the said William Patton together with the sd Dulce to him and his heirs forever,” p 317
Jack, Man, to “nephew John Gray, son of Archibald and to pay each of his brothers and sisters an equal share of the value of Jack, reserving two shares to himself,” p 317
Estate Appraisal ordered at Dec 1825 Court, recorded Jul 1826 Court, pages 336-337.
unnamed, Man, likely Jack from the will, p 337
unnamed, Woman, likely Dulce from the will, p 337
unnamed, Child, likely Emily from the will, p 337

PACK, John Estate Appraisal orded Dec 1825 Court, recorded in Court Feb 1826, pages 325-328.
– Shada, Girl, p 327

PATTON, Robert Will dated 7 Aug 1823, recorded in Oct 1823 Court, page 197.
More, Man, “to be sold after my decease and my executors shal sel said More by private sale endeuvouring to get him a good Master…” p 197

PENCE, Jacob Will dated 17 Nov 1820, recorded in Court 19 Dec 1820, pages 77-79.
unnamed, Girl, “My Negro girl is not to be sold but remain on the place and if she should have seven Children eatch of my Children have one and the youngest son Washington to have the Negro Mother, but if she should not have saven Children hur and hur Children must be sold by the Executors and the time of Credit is with teh executors and the money equlley divided among my Children,” p 78
Estate Appraisal completed 3 Sep 1821, pages 79-80, estate sale follows the appraisal.
unnamed, Girl, p 80

RAEBURN, John Sr Will dated 10 Feb 1823, recorded in Court Nov 1824, pages 238-239.
Amey, Girl, to wife Elizabeth Raeburn, then to son Isaac Raeburn after her death, p 238
Abigal, Girl, to son John Raeburn, after wife Elizabeth’s death, p 239 
Elijah, Boy, to son John Raeburn, after wife Elizabeth’s death, p 239
James, Boy, to son Charles Raeburn, already in his possession, p 239
Lucinda, Girl, to daughter Margaret Tracey, p 239
Feny, Girl, to daughter Margaret Tracey, p 239
Sarah, Girl, to son Henry Raeburn, p 239
Malitia, no gender or age specified, to son Isaac Raeburn, p 239
Kinder, no gender or age specified, to son Isaac Raeburn, p 239
Mary, no gender or age specified, to son Isaac Raeburn, p 239

SHAWVER, John Estate Appraisal completed 24 Jun 1828, recorded Jun 1829 Court, pages 494-498.
Rody (?), Girl, aged 14 years, page 497

SHAWVER, Sebastian Estate Appraisal dated 28 Mar 1818, recorded at Court 22 Aug 1823, page 185.
unnamed, Woman, [likely Rose mentioned in the will in Vol 1], p 185
unnamed, Child (of unnamed woman above), not mentioned in will, p 185
Nancy, Girl, not mentioned in will, p 185
Maria, Girl, not mentioned in will, p 185
Jim, Boy, [likely Jame mentioned in will to be given to grandson Samuel Longton], p 185
Betsy, Girl, given to daughter Barbarra Rowen in will, p 185
Davy, Man, mentioned in will, to be sold and the funds equally divided, p 185
Lewis, Boy, mentioned in will, given to daughter Elizabeth Hambarger, p 185

SHUMATE, Daniel Will dated 7 Jul 1826, recorded in Aug 1826 Court, pages 368-370.
Liza, Woman, to wife Milley, p 369
Grinnage, Boy, to be divided between four of his children after his wife Milley’s death: Betsey, Silas, John, and Polly, p 369
Hetty, Girl, to son Tollison, p 369
unnamed, all slaves (etc) not already divised in the will to be equally divided between Daniel, Nancy, Peggy, Rhoda, Malinda, and Rachel, p 369
Estate Appraisal completed 31 Aug 1826, recorded at Dec 1827 Court, pages 375-377.
Liza, left to widow Milly Shumate, p 375
Grinage, Infant [noting that any individual under the age of 21 could be called an Infant], left to widow Milly Shumate, p 375
Hetty, Infant [noting that any individual under the age of 21 could be called an Infant], left to Tolisson Shumate, p 375
Pheobe, Girl, part of the remaining estate not otherwise devised, p 376
George, Boy, part of the remaining estate not otherwise devised, p 376
Estate Sale held 1 Sep 1826, recorded by the Court Dec 1827, pages 377-381
Pheobe, Girl, sold to Larken Tuggle by virtue of power of attorney (receipt on pg 419), p 379
George, Boy, sold to John McDaniel by virtue of power of attorney (receipt on pg 419), p 379

SPARR, George Will dated 25 Feb 1823, recorded on 20 May 1823 at Court, page 179.
Rose, Woman, to wife Sally Sparr for her lifetime, then to nephew George Sparr son of John Sparr, along with any increase, p 179
Minty, Girl, to wife Sally Sparr for her lifetime… also to niece Catharine Spar daughter of John Spar, forever, p 179
David, Man, to brother John Sparr, p 179
Rachael, Girl, to niece Sally Spar daughter of John Spar, p 179
Dolly, Girl, to niece Elizabeth Spar daughter of John Spar, p 179
Estate Appraisal, not dated, recorded at Oct 1823 Court, page 200.
David, Man, p 200
Rose, Woman, p 200
unnamed, Child of Rose, not mentioned in will, p 200
Rachel, Girl, p 200
Minty, Girl, p 200
Dolly, Girl, p 200

SYMMS, Samuel Will dated 21 Jun 1819, recorded in Court 15 May 1821, page 96.
Stot, Bound Boy, “and my will is that givens otherwise Stot a bound boy I have do live with my wife [Margaret Symms] and to her use until he is of age then she do for him Indentures direct or more if she think proper…” page 96

VAWTER, William Will dated 26 Nov 1818, recorded in Court 17 Dec 1822, page 155.
Nelly, Female, p 155
Jerry, Male, p 155
Willis, Male, p 155
“‘Tis my desire that Jerry shoud have his freedom at any time he will take it or desire it – also Nelly if she wishes her freedom and will go to where she can have it, and Willis is to be free is he chooses to have it by complying with the laws of the state, at the age of twenty five years old, but if any or all chooses to stay with any of my family my will is that they are well used, and if they stay longer with the family than myself or wife lives they may choose with branch of the family to live with they pleas. If they choose to go where they can be free my Executors is requested to Emancipate them.”

Speaking Names: Monroe County, (West) Virginia Will Book Vol I, 1799-1817

Tags

, ,

In a previous post, Speaking Names. The Slave Name Roll Project, I talked about an initiative to try to give researchers and descendants of slave ancestors hope to bridge the 1870 gap. It is called the Slave Name Roll Project, started by Schalene Jennings Dagutis at Tangled Roots and Trees, and this post is my first, of hopefully many, additions to it.

My earliest ancestor in my patrilineal line was a man by the name of John Spade, who lived in Monroe County, Virginia (which later became part of West Virginia), in the late 1700 – early 1800s. In my search for him, and members of his FAN (Friends, Associates, Neighbors) club, as coined by Elizabeth Shown Mills, I discovered that the Monroe County Will Books volumes 1-18 spanning from 1799 until 1969 have been digitized and are available on FamilySearch.org. Unfortunately, many of these books are not yet indexed, which would make my job easier, but I could easily miss some really interesting clues and information about my families and their lives. So, all that to say, I was planning on going through these books page by page anyhow, looking for any mentions of my names, when the ball started rolling on this worthwhile Slave Name Roll Project, and I decided to make my reading matter to someone else while I was at it. Below you will find each and (hopefully) every mention of an enslaved individual in the entire first volume. I hope you will join me in Speaking their Names.

**Please note that I have provided below any names as I see them written, and indicated the gender and or age as these people were described (for example: Woman, Wench, Girl, Child, Man, Boy). I have also noted to whom they were bequeathed to if specified for the purpose of further tracking. Unless otherwise noted, the following people were described as slaves or negroes.

West Virginia Will Books, Monroe, Volume I, 1799-1817, by order of the Estate holder’s name:

ALEXANDER, James – Will, written 16 May 1813, proven in Monroe County Court in July 1814, pages 256-259.

Patience, Woman, to wife Isabella Alexander, pg 256

Mary, “oldest child of Patience,” to wife Isabella Alexander, pg 256

Calm, Man, to wife Isabella Alexander, then son Mathew Alexander, pg 257

Cicilia, Girl Child “the second child of Patience,” to son Henry Alexander, pg 259

Abriham/Abram, Man, to son Henry Alexander “if ever obtained or any thing for him he the said Abram having some time before this Eloped from my possession.” pg 259

BICKETT, Michael – Estate Appraisal, 15 Nov 1814 and 26 Jan 1815, proven in Monroe County Court 23 Mar 1815, pages 273-276

Lucky, Woman, pg 276

There is a record of the Estate Sale conducted on 25 Aug 1814 beginning on page 277, which may include Lucky and who she was purchased by, unfortunately in the digitization process the pages 278 and 279 containing the bulk of the Estate Sale information was skipped. I have contacted FamilySearch in the hopes that this might be remedied and we can continue to track Lucky.

BINSON, Mathias – Estate Appraisal, 11 Feb 1809, proven in Monroe County Court Feb 1809, pages 148 & 150 (due to a numbering error in the book, there is no page 149).

Rachel, Black Girl, pg 150

BOWYER, Adam – Estate Appraisal, 16 May 1815, proved same day, pages 288-291. There is a will in the book for Adam Bowyer as well, but it does not mention any slaves.

Charlotte, Woman, pg 290

Sally, Girl, pg 290

Dolly, Child, pg 290

BYRNSIDE, John – Will dated 29 Sep 1816, proven in Monroe County Court 15 Oct 1816, page 353-355, mentions slaves but none by name (to be divided equally between his wife and six children). Estate Appraisal dated 9 Dec 1816, proven in Monroe County Court on 21 Dec 1817, pages 375-377.

– Matt, Man, pg 375

– Billy, Man, pg 375

– James, Man, pg 375

– Bob, Man, pg 375

– Jack, Boy, pg 375

– Nelly, Girl, pg 375

– Charlotte, Girl, pg 375

CLARK, Sarah – Will dated 26 May 1808, proven in Monroe County Court in Dec 1809, pages 167-168.

Cinklear, Boy, to son Ralph Clark, pg 167

– Lucy, Girl, to daughter Martha Campbell, pg 167

– Theaphilis, Boy, to son John Clark, pg 167

– Grace, Woman, to son Samuel Clark, pg 167

– Maddison, Boy, to son Samuel Clark, pg 167

Estate Inventory of Sarah Clark on 26 May 1810, proven at Monroe County Court in June 1810, page 177.

– Grace, Woman (willed to Samuel Clark)

– unnamed, 6 month old daughter of Grace

– Lucy, ~10 year old Girl (willed to Martha Campbell)

– Madison, ~8 year old Boy (willed to Samuel Clark)

– Theophlias, ~6 year old Boy (willed to John Clark)

– Stricklar, ~4 year old Boy (likely the boy willed to Ralph Clark)

DEW, Betty – Estate Appraisal dated 13 Aug 1817, proven in Monroe County Court 19 Aug 1817, pages 391-193.

– Harry, Boy, pg 391

FLESHMAN, Peter – Will dated 22 Sep 1811, proven in Monroe County Court May 1814, pages 254-255.

– Luce, Woman, to son John Fleshman, pg 255

Estate Appraisal not dated but proven in Monroe County Court 15 Aug 1815, pages 317-318.

– Luce, Old Woman, pg 317

Estate Sale dated 12 Nov 1814, proven in Monroe County Court 15 Aug 1815, pages 319-321.

unnamed (but very likely Luce), wench, sold to John Fleshman (to whom Luce was willed), pg 319

FRANKLIN, Martin – Estate Appraisal not dated, proven in Monroe County Court Nov 1808, page 178.

– unnamed, Woman, pg 178

GRAHAM, James – Will dated 28 Dec 1812, proven in Monroe County Court Feb 1813, pages 223-227.

– Rose, Wench, to wife Florence, pg 223

– Cleary, Girl, to wife Florence, to be sold after Florence’s death, pg 223

– Ceasar, Boy, to son Samuel Graham “never to be sold nor ever taken from his family during his life,” pg 224

– Benjamin, Man, to son Lanty Graham and wife Florence Graham “in common… not to be disposed of” after wife Florence’s death, pg 224

– Cleary Senr, Woman, to daughter Elisabeth Stodghill

– Dinah, Girl, to daughter Rebeckah Graham and her children “never to be disposed of out of the Family nor the increase of the Negro if any she has,” pg 224

– Hannah, Girl, to daughter Florence Taylor “never to be disposed of nor her increase (if any) out of the Family,” 224

GULLETT, William – Blacksmith, Will dated 28 Jan 1802, proven in Monroe County Court 20 Mar 1805, pages 51-53.

– Milly, Wench, to wife Jean Gullett then son William Gullett after Jean’s death, pg 51

– Fanny, (no age or gender specified), to son George Gullett, pg 51

– Levin (?) (unsure of the name written), to son George Gullett, pg 51

Estate Appraisal dated 7 Jun 1805, proven in Monroe County Court Jun 1805, pages 59-60.

unnamed, Wench, likely Milly, pg 59

unnamed, Boy, likely Levin(?), pg 59

unnamed, Girl, likely Fanny, pg 59

HANDLEY/HANLY, John – Will dated 27 Dec 1810, proven in Monroe County Court Feb 1811, pages 183-185.

– Feeb, Woman, pg 183

unnamed, Child of Feeb, pg 183

“Fourthly, I allow my Daughter Margret Clark and Sarah Keys the price of a Negro woman and child the woman Named Feeb but said Negro woman is to choose her master and my Executors is to make the best contract the[y] can with him for said Negroes on behalf of my said Daughters by giving one Years credit, and if said Executors cannot get what the[y] think a reasonable price from said Master so chosen by said Negro then they are to sell her to any other for the best price the[y] can get allowing the credit above.”

– Liddy, Girl, to daughter Nancy Akin, pg 183

– Peter, Boy, to son James, pg 183

– Jake, Boy, to son Alexander, pg 183

– Eamy, Girl, to daughter Betsy Waker [Walker], pg 183

– Tilde, Girl, to wife Mary, but not to be sold at Mary’s death, pg 184

– Dave, Man, to be sold along with anything not otherwise specified by will, pg 184

Estate Appraisal dated 20 Feb 1811, proven in Monroe County Court 21 May 1811, pages 189-193.

– Dave, Man, to be sold according to will, pg 191

– Phoeby, Woman, likely Feeb from the will, pg 191

unnamed, Child of Pheoby, pg 191

– Till, Girl, to wife Mary per will, pg 191

– Jacob, Boy, likely the Boy called Jake bequeathed to Alexander in the will, pg 191

– Liddy, Girl, to Nancy Akin per will, pg 191

– Peter, Boy, to James per will, pg 191

– Amy, Girl, to Betsy Waker per will, pg 192 in a separate listing of property produced for appraisal by the Executors on 15 Mar 1811

Estate Sale of John Hanly, not dated, proven in Monroe County Court 18 Jun 1816, pages 345-346.

Dake, (no gender or age specified), likely Dave who was to be sold per the will, sold to Chrisley Hoke, pg 346

unnamed Woman, likely Pheoby/Feeb, sold to Chrisley Hoke, pg 346

unnamed Child, likely the child of Pheoby/Feeb, sold to Chrisley Hoke, pg 346

Estate Accounts of John Hanly, not dated, proved in Monroe County Court 17 Sep 1816, five years after the will and estate appraisal were brought to court, pages 349-351.

– Matilda, Girl, likely the same person as Tilde and Till, delivered to Mrs. Hanly, pg 349 and 350.

– Peter, Boy, delivered to James Hanly, pg 349 and 350

Liddy, Girl, delivered to Nancy Akins, pg 349 and 350

Amy, Girl, delivered to W E Walker, pg 349 and 350

Jacob, Boy, delivered to Alex. Hanly, pg 349 and 350

unnamed, Woman, likely Pheoby/Feeb, pg 349 and 350 “[Margret] Clark’s receipt for one half the amt of a negro woman 157 12” “[Sarah] Keys [?] negro woman 157 12” According to will, Phoeby/Feeb was to pick between two of the daughters of John Hanly as her new master, the other daughter to receive payment for her, or to be sold and they split the price. There is a sale to Chrisly Hoke that very closely matches the payments made to the two daughters for a woman and child. 

JARRELL, Daniel – Will dated 10 Jan 1804, proven in Monroe County Court 21 Feb 1804, pages 39 and 40. No identifying informations besides their names was given, all to be left to his wife, Mary.

Milly, pg 39

Dine, pg 39

Castly, pg 39

Esther, pg 39

LEACH, William – Will written on 3 Sep 1807, proven in Monroe County Court Apr 1808, pages 94-95.

unnamed, Woman, to be freed at his death, pg 94

Seal, Girl, to wife Susannah, pg 94

Bill of the Appraisement that the Widow [Susannah Leach] was Allowed, not dated, proven in Monroe County Court May 1809, page 182.

unnamed, Mulatto Girl, likely Seal, pg 182

LEGG, Thomas – Will dated 10 Jun 1807, proven in Monroe County Court Sep 1808, pages 129-130.

Adam, Fellow, “allow to be hired out by my Executors, and the same for the use of … my wife,” pg 130

Estate Appraisal, dated 17 Mar 1812, proven in Monroe County Court May 1812, pages 198-200.

Adam, (no gender or age description), Adam is mentioned in the will, pg 198

Winney, (no gender or age description), pg 198

Estate Sale, 28 Mar 1812,  proven in Monroe County Court May 1812, pages 201-203.

Adam, (no gender or age description), sold to Christ. Hoke, pg 201

Winney, (no gender or age description), sold to John McNutt, pg 201

LEWIS, Thomas – Major Thomas Lewis’ Estate Inventory, dated 27 Nov 1804, was proven in Monroe County Court 15 Oct 1805, pages 68-71.

Davie, Man, pg 70

Lewis, William – William Lewis, of Botetourt County, Virginia, will dated 17 Mar 1801, proven in Greenbrier Court March 1813, and then in Monroe County Court 18 Nov 1817, pages 394-395.

unnamed, multiple slaves referenced but not by name, quantity, or gender, as one-third being left to wife Mary, the rest to son Charles and his heirs, pg 394

Anthony, Boy, left to grandson William Lewis, son to John Lewis, pg 394

LINTON, William – Will dated 24 Oct 1810. proven in Monroe County Court 20 Jul 1815, pages 303-305.

Cesar, Fellow, “As to my negro fellow Cesar my will & desire is that he is to stay on the plantation & my two sons John B Linton & James N Linton is to take care of him & support him during life.” pg 304

MANN, Jacob – Estate Appraisal dated 21 Mar 1815, proven in Monroe County Court 16 May 1815, page, 285-287.

unnamed, Mulatto Slave Girl, pg 287

MCDOWELL, Archibald – Will dated 2 Aug 1813, proven in Monroe County Court Aug 1813, pages 232-233.

Kate, (no gender or age description), to be sold,  pg 232

Stephen, (no gender or age description), to be sold, pg 232

Isaac, (no gender or age description), to be sold, pg 232

Estate Appraisal dated 2 Sep 1813, proven in Monroe County Court Jan 1814, pages 234-236. Names match the 3 people listed in the will.

Stephen, Man, pg 234

Isaac, Mulatto Boy, pg 234

Kate, Woman, pg 234

Estate Sale of Archibald McDowell, the first page(s) of which are not included in the microfilm which skipped pages 278 and 279. The Sale was proven in the Monroe County Court Jan 1815, continued on pages 280-281. Names match the will and appraisal.

unnamed, Woman, likely Kate from the will and appraisal, sold to Lewis Forlander, pg 280

Isaac, Boy, sold to James McDowell, pg 280

Stephen, Boy, sold to John Knox, pg 280

MILBOURNE, Nathan – Estate Appraisal dated 14 Dec 1808, proven in Monroe County Court Nov 1808 [no, those dates do not make sense to me either], pages 142-144.

Fancy, Woman, pg 144

Estate Sale of Nathan Milbourne, not dated, proven in Monroe County Court Nov 1808, pages 145-148.

unnamed, Woman, likely Fancy mentioned in appraisal, sold to Nathan Milbourn, pg 146

NICKELL, Robert – Will dated 16 Aug 1813, proven in Monroe County Court Nov 1813, pages 236-238.

Dilse/Desse, Woman, to wife including any issue (children) that she may have, pg 236

Bill, issue of Dilse/Desse, to wife, pg 236

Sal, issue of Dilse/Desse, to wife then to Robert Nickell’s sister Susannah after wife’s death or marriage, and then to Susannah’s son Andrew Lewis, pg 236 – “I allow Andrew Lewis at his mothers death or as soon as the above Negro Girl comes into his hands to Pay his brother George fifty Dollars”

Bet, Girl, to nephew John Nickell, son of Robert’s brother Thomas Nickells, pg 237

Sam, Boy, to nephew John Nickell, son of Robert’s brother Thomas Nickells, pg 237

Jack, Man, “I allow to remain on the Place six years and then to be sold & divided between my two Brothers Joseph & Isaac Nickells” pg 237

Estate Appraisal dated 8 Dec 1813, proven at Monroe County Court 17 Dec 1816, pages 370 and facing page (numbering error as the page adjacent to 370 is not numbered, and the following pages are 371 and 372).

Jacob, Man, likely Jack from the will, pg 370

Sam, Young Boy, pg 370

Bill, Boy, child of Dilse/Desse per the will, pg 370

Sall, Young Girl, child of Dilse/Desse per the will, pg 370

Bet, Girl, pg 370

Dilse, Woman, pg 370

NICKELL/NICKLE/NICHOLS, THOMAS – Will dated 22 Aug 1803, proven in Monroe County Court 17 Mar 1807, pages 84-85.

Caesar, Man, to son John after wife Jane’s death, Caesar was purchased from Thomas Nichols’ brother Isaac, pg 84

Sam, Man, after wife Jane’s death Sam to be sold at public auction, Sam was purchased from Thomas’ brother Andrew, pg 84

Estate Appraisal dated 27 Mar 1808, proven May 1808 court, pages 96-98.

Bets, Woman, pg 96

Estate Sale dated 3 Apr 1807, proven May 1808 court, pages 99-101.

unnamed, Woman, likely Bets from the appraisal, sold to Robert Robinson, pg 100

Estate Sale dated 25 Jan 1811, proven Nov 1811 court, pages 204-206.

Sam, Man, sold to John Masten, pg 204

Neace, Man, aka Caesar from the Thomas Nickell’s will, pg 206. According to the will, Caesar was to be willed to John Nickell, but according to this Estate Sale, he was sold by Thomas Nickell prior to his death. No mention as to whom Caesar/Neace was sold to.

Estate Appraisal of the deceased widow of Thomas Nickell, not dated, proven in court Jun 1812, pages 210-212.

Sam, Man, pg 212

Estate Settlement of Thomas Nickell, dated 20 Nov 1813, proven in court Jan 1814, page 241.

Caesar/Neace, Man, pg 21, “It appears to us that Caeser (alias Neace) named in the will was sold by the testator in his Lifetime, and then the Exrs ought not to be charged with the ₤20 mentioned at the foot of the Vendue List…” 

PATTERSON, MATTHEW – Estate Inventory dated 7 Sep 1803, no date for when it was recorded in the Will Book, but the previous entries say Sep 1803 court, pages 37-38.

Phyllis, Woman, pg 37

Jack, Man, pg 37

Jerry, Man, pg 37

Harry, Boy, pg 37

Sampson, Boy, pg 37

Poll, Woman, pg 37

Hamlet, Boy, pg 37

Flora, Girl, pg 37

Jo, Boy Child, pg 37

PATTON, ROBERT – Estate Appraisal not dated, proven at Monroe County Court Oct 1808, pages 131-134.

Sam, Boy, pg 134

Estate Sale dated 26 Nov 1804 and 12 Apr 1805, proven in Monroe County Court Oct 1809, pages 163-166.

Sam, Boy, “Elenor Patton 1 Negro boy (Sam) by Jas Gray” pg 165

ROYALL, WILLIAM – Major William Royall’s Estate Appraisal dated 22 Mar 1813, proven in Monroe County Court Sep 1814, pages 269-273.

Stepny, Man, pg 272

Catena, Woman, pg 272

Betsy, Girl, pg 272

Davey, Man, pg 272

SHAVER/SHAWVER, SEBASTIAN “BOSTEN” – Will dated Jan 1813, proven in Monroe County Court 15 Oct 1816, page 355-357.

Lewis, Boy, to daughter Elizabeth Hambarger, then after her and her husband’s death to her son Baston Hambarger, pg 356

David, Man, to daughter Barbarra Rowen, and after her death to be sold and the funds to be divided equally amongst her children, pg 356

Betsy, Girl, to daughter Barbarra Rowen, and after her death to her son Bosten Rowen forever, pg 356

Rose, Woman, to daughter Sally, and after her death Rose and her increase to descend to Sally’s heirs forever, pg 356

Jame (?), Boy, to grandson Samuel Longton, forever, pg 356

There are 83 Names Spoken here. At least 4 more that go unnamed here. I hope that these notes make sense, and might provide an aid to researchers of these individuals.

Speaking Names. The Slave Name Roll Project.

Tags

,

"Official medallion of the British Anti-Slavery Society (1795)" by Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795) and either William Hackwood or Henry Webber; "Josiah Wedgewood...produced the emblem as a jasper-ware cameo at his pottery factory. Although the artist who designed and engraved the seal is unknown, the design for the cameo is attributed to William Hackwood or to Henry Webber, who were both modelers at the Wedgewood factory." (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/2h67.html PBS]) - British Abolition Movement. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Official_medallion_of_the_British_Anti-Slavery_Society_(1795).jpg#mediaviewer/File:Official_medallion_of_the_British_Anti-Slavery_Society_(1795).jpg

“Official medallion of the British Anti-Slavery Society (1795)” from Wikimedia Commons

My dear friend and West Virginia cousin, Cathy Meder-Dempsey, is a spectacular blogger at Opening Doors in Brick Walls. A recent series of posts (Black History Month: The Slaves of James SIMS: Parts 1, 2, and 3) regarding her ancestor’s participation in the unfortunate institution of slavery has taken wing and given light to another wonderful blogger, Schalene Jennings Dagutis of Tangled Roots and Trees, to create a project that would help researchers with slave ancestors. The Slave Name Roll Project is a crowd-sourced project, and cannot be done by just a few. As researchers are coming across these people who were denied so very much in life, the least we can do is give them back their names, in hopes that their descendants might have a chance at finding them.

True's statement

Image used with permission by Cathy Meder-Dempsey. Quote by True A. Lewis of http://mytrueroots.blogspot.com/

 

So far in my research, I have not come across any slave-holders in my ancestry. But in attempting to remove my 21st century views and morals, it would be remiss of me to believe that all of my many ancestors disapproved of the act, and more likely that many just did not have the ways and means to participate in it. I hope that more and more researchers and bloggers commit to assisting in this worthy and long overdue project. Many of these names are hidden away in Wills, Estate Appraisals and Sales, private papers and ledgers. As I come across these names in my research I am going to make an effort to note them and add them to the growing Slave Name Roll Project. Won’t you join us?

52 Ancestors 52 Weeks: #3 Caroline “Callie” Hassner Roessler

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

This is my third post for Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge. You can read more about the Challenge, and find other bloggers’ submissions linked on Amy’s blog No Story Too Small.

I’m behind… what’s new? I’m going to blame serendipity again. This tale, what little I know of it thus far, was meant to go out last week. You’ll understand at the end, perhaps. This one is a little lengthy. Click on images to see them enlarged.

Caroline Hassner Brooke County Birth record (full page)

WVCulture image, line 37, birth record of Caroline “Callie” Hassner

Callie Hassner BR 16Dec1862

Caroline “Callie” Hassner, my husband’s Great Great Grandmother, was born on December 16th, 1862 in Wellsburg, Brooke County, in Virginia. Just a few short months later, on June 30th, 1863, Brooke County was included in the newly formed state of West Virginia. Caroline was the daughter of Charles William Hassner, Jr., a Grocer according to her birth record, and Ophelia Deighton (Dayton). Charles William and Ophelia were blessed early in their marriage, as they had married that February 13th (1862), when just 22 and 20 years old, respectively. Caroline was the first of at least seven children born to the couple, five girls and 2 boys.

  • Caroline, born 1862
  • Decima, born 1864
  • Sarah, 1867-1868
  • William, born 1868
  • Maude, born 1872
  • Gertie, born 1876
  • Charles Frederick, 1881-1955

The young family is found in the 1870 Census still residing in Wellsburg, Brooke County, West Virginia. Wm [William] Hassner is the head of household, age 31, employed as a County Assessor, and wife Ophelia, age 27, both born in Virginia. Their children, all born in West Virginia, are Callie, 8, Edessa, 6, and Wm [William], 3 years old. I assume that they are renting their home at the time as no real estate value is listed, they do, however, have $1000 value in their personal estate.

1870 US Census, West Virginia, Brooke County, Wellsburg, Wm Hassner Household detail

In the 1880 census, we see the family has moved from Wellsburg, West Virginia, to LaGrange, Jefferson County, Ohio. Charles W Hassner, 41, is now keeping a hotel with his wife Ophelia, a 38 year old “Land Lady.” Five children are listed living with them: Callie, 17 years old; Decima, 16 years old; William, 12 years old; Maude, 8 years old; and on the following page is Girtrude, 7 years old.

Charles W Hassner Household, Detail page 1

1880 US Census, Ohio, Jefferson County, LaGrange, Charles W Hassner Household, Detail, continues on next enumeration page.

Charles W Hassner Household, Detail page 2

1880 US Census, Ohio, Jefferson County, LaGrange, Charles W Hassner Household, Detail continued.

Less than two years later, Caroline marries Henry Roessler, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Their marriage license was signed on 27 Jan 1882 in Jefferson County, Ohio. They married two days later on 29 January, 1882, a Sunday, by a minister named D. M. Hollister. I’d love to learn how they met… it must have been a relatively short courtship, at least by today’s standards, as Henry is listed in the 1880 census (dated 9 June 1880) still living with his parents, Christ and Louisa, in Pittsburgh.

 Unfortunately, I know little of their life together outside of the census and city directory information I have found on their family. Caroline and Henry became parents to 4 children, as seen in the 1900 census:

  • Christopher William, born Aug 1882, just 8 months into their marriage.
  • Ophelia “Phe,” born Jun 1884
  • Ralph Elwood, born May 1887
  • George, born Apr 1890

1910 US Census Indiana, Grant County, Marion, Henry Roessler Household detail pt2

1910 US Census Indiana, Grant County, Marion, Henry Roessler Household detail pt2

The family address is listed as 1108 West Fifth Street in 1900, and Fifth Street is where they stayed. Starting in the 1910 census and through the 1940 census, they reside at 1109 Fifth Street. I have found the home on Zillow.com, and the house is a split residence, offering two units, 1107 and 1109. I’m not sure if the residence has always been split, there was no entry for 1107 West Fifth Street in the 1910 census, but it was a nice income property for the couple in their later years, the renters in the 1930 and 1940 censuses report paying $30 per month in rent.

The 2 unit home that Henry and Caroline lived in for many years.

The 2 unit home that Henry and Caroline lived in for many years from Zillow.com, The door on the left is the 1107 residence, and the door in the corner is the 1109 entrance.

1920 US Census Indiana, Grant County, Marion Henry Roessler and (son) Ralph Roessler households detail. I believe Ralph's address is meant to be corrected to 1107, somewhat visible above 1109, which is clearly visible.

1920 US Census Indiana, Grant County, Marion Henry Roessler and (son) Ralph Roessler households detail. I believe Ralph’s address is meant to be corrected to 1107, somewhat visible above 1109, which is clearly visible.

Just a few short months after the 1940 census, Caroline was left a widow at the age of 78. Her husband of nearly 59 years passed away following a short, but serious, illness according to his obituaries. After Henry’s death, Caroline went to live with her daughter “Phe” and family.

Caroline “Callie” Hassner Roessler passed away on 7 Feb 1947, following a short illness (arterio sclerosis, according to the death register I received from Marion Public Library). Her Obituary was found in two newspapers indexed by the kind volunteers at the Marion Public Library, The Marion Indiana Chronicle on 7 Feb 1947 (page 1, column 4) and  The Marion Indiana Leader Tribune on 8 Feb 1947 (page 1, column 1). A testament indeed to make the first page, I think.

Death Record of Caroline Roessler, Marion Public Library, Marion, Indiana, Book 13, Page 19, Reel #9

Death Record of Caroline Roessler, Marion Public Library, Marion, Indiana, Book 13, Page 19, Reel #9

Caroline Hassner Roessler Obit 7Feb1947 Caroline Hassner Roessler Obit 8Feb1947So this is where things get a little spooky for me.

I started doing genealogy on my family rather seriously in 2005, when I moved to Arizona from Ohio, after our January wedding. I didn’t start on his line right away, and honestly didn’t put a lot of effort into it until recently. Sure, I’d gotten quite a bit, enough to get me a few generations back on each side. But putting meat back on these bones? Nope, hadn’t done much, still have a long way to go.

When we were expecting our first child in January 2007, we had the usual battle over names. We had a short list of possibilities, but my husband had honed in on one girl name that I wasn’t exactly sold on… Callie. Now mind you, he grew up not really knowing any of the names mentioned above, besides George, his great grandfather, who passed away over 6 years before he was born. I had only seen the censuses listing Caroline as Caroline. Callie was not in our lexicon of family names. Even Scott’s grandmother, Ruth, had not known Caroline as Callie.

We named our daughter Callie, not knowing it was a family name. She was born on 7 February 2007, after being 9 days past due. Sixty years, to the day, after Caroline “Callie” Hassner Roessler’s death.

The Roessler Family, circa 1905. Seated left - to - right: Christopher William, Henry, Ralph Elwood. Standing, left - to - right: Ophelia "Phe," George, and Caroline "Callie" Hassner Roessler. Photo original in the possession of family.

The Roessler Family, circa 1905. Seated left – to – right: Christopher William, Henry, Ralph Elwood. Standing, left – to – right: Ophelia “Phe,” George, and Caroline “Callie” Hassner Roessler. Photo original in the possession of family.

My Wishlist for Caroline:

  • Try to learn more about who she was as a person. Do you have stories of Grandma Caroline?
  • Get a photo of her final resting place in the IOOF mausoleum, as well as the other Roesslers I know are also nearby.
  • Transcribe and post the letter she wrote to her son George following the death of his wife.
  • More photos! Surely there are more photos of her, she lived until 1947.

 

52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #2: Louisa Mansderfer Roessler

Tags

, , ,

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

This is my second post for Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge. You can read more about the Challenge, and find other bloggers’ submissions linked on Amy’s blog No Story Too Small.

Last week I profiled in great detail all of the current information I have on my husband’s third great grandfather, Christ Roessler. So, this week, I thought I’d share the little bit of information I have on his wife Louisa. Her maiden name of Mansderfer/Mansderver is from Christ’s Pension Questionnaires filled out in 1898 (1) and 1899 (2) (see Christ’s post). The birth information I have for Louisa is found on her burial monument (12 Feb 1835) and is supported by the given ages in the census records. In the 1870 (3), the earliest census record I have found for the family so far, she is listed as 35 years old and having been born in Baden, putting her birth date around 1835. In the next census, 1880 (4), she is listed as 44 years old and being born in Bremen, birth date around 1836. I’m not up on my German principalities and timelines, etc so I’m not sure on which they came from, her birthplace matches Christ’s on both [Christ’s last census, 1900, stated Germany as his birthplace].

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1870

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1870

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1880

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1880

I know from one of her husband’s pension papers that Louisa died 5 July 1898 (2), and have a photo of her monument stone in the Birmingham Cemetery in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (see below) that lists her death date on 7 Jul 1898. The “Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh City Deaths, 1870-1905” database, indexed on FamilySearch.org, lists her death date as 5 Jul 1898 (5), but her age as 53 with a birth year of 1845, which is possibly transcribed incorrectly, I will have to find the originals if possible.

There seems to be a Roessler family plot there, but I have not been here myself to know who all is in that area. A representative of the Birmingham UCC Church (this is the church the Roessler family were members of, and associated with the cemetery) connected me with a woman named Sharon (email dated 20 Jun 2013) who checked the cemetery for me and gave me the following information on the Roesslers in Birmingham Cemetery:

Section A
Christ Roessler military stone died 24 Mar 1909
Louisa died 7 July 1898 [wife of Christ]
Albert C Roessler age 57 died 22 Dec 1933  [son of Christ & Louisa]
Marie age 80 dies 4 June 1958 [wife of Albert C Roessler]

Albert C Jr. age 42 died 28 Nov 1944 [son of Albert C & Marie]
Clara W. age 79 died 9 Aug 1974 [wife of Albert C Roessler Jr]
Walter R Roessler 1 month died 26 Apr 1923 [I *think* he is a son of Albert Jr & Clara]
Jacob died 11 Jan 1894 [son of Christ & Louisa]
 
Section 4 Lot 338
Christopher Roessler 1855 – 1902 [son of Christ & Louisa]
Mary Roessler age 84 died 14 Apr 1941 [wife of Christopher Roessler]

Photo credit Karen Young

Photo credit Karen Young

Roessler Family plot at Birmingham Cemetery. Large monument includes Louisa, wife of Christ Roessler, and their son Albert Charles (and wife Marie), military headstone ofChrist to the left. Footstones along the tree line are believed to be a part of this plot as well. Photo credit Karen Young

Roessler Family plot at Birmingham Cemetery. Large monument includes Louisa, wife of Christ Roessler, and their son Albert Charles (and wife Marie), military headstone of Christ to the left. Footstones along the tree line are believed to be a part of this plot as well. Photo credit Karen Young

So, according to her headstone, Louisa was born 12 Feb 1835 and died on 7 Jul 1898, having lived 63 years. According to the pension papers, Christ and Louisa were married either on 22 Feb (2) or 3 Mar 1855 (1), which would put Louisa at just 20 years of age, once I get into those microfilmed church records held at the University of Pittsburgh Archives, I hope to be able to find their marriage entry, as well as the children’s births. I do not have any clue as yet to Louisa’s emigration to the United States, and if she married in Pittsburgh at the age of 20, she may have come to the US with family. I have not researched the Mansderfer name. She had at least 6 known children with Christ: Christopher, Henry, Lizzie, Caroline, Albert C, and Jacob. Jacob was not included in the pension papers (see previous post) as he died in 1894, prior to the first questionnaire Christ completed in June 1898.

My wishlist for Louisa

  • Try to find Louisa’s entry into the United States, did she travel with any family or friends?
  • Research the Mansderfer/Mansderver name
  • Thorough research of the Church records for Louisa’s maiden name (confirmation of pension record info), marriage entry, children’s births, death records
  • What was Pittsburgh life like during the Civil War while Louisa was home, seemingly alone, while Chris served his adopted country, with small children to care for?
  • Contact the Allegheny County Courthouse for the actual record entry for Louisa’s death in the “Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh City Deaths, 1870-1905” indexed on FamilySearch.org
  1. Department of the Interior Bureau of Pensions Questionnaire dated 15 January 1898, signed 6 June 1898.
  2. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions Questionnaire dated 6 January 1899, signed 9 January 1899.
  3. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZL7-NF3 : accessed 15 Jan 2014), Louisa Rosler in household of Chr Rosler, Pennsylvania, United States; citing p. , family 302, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552792.
  4. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MW6G-MPZ : accessed 15 Jan 2014), Louisa Reissler in household of Christ. Reissler, Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United States; citing sheet 279A, family 1, NARA microfilm publication T9-1095
  5. “Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh City Deaths, 1870-1905,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KFGS-MTG : accessed 15 Jan 2014), Roessler in entry for Louisa Roessler, 1898.

52 Ancestors 52 Weeks: #1 Christ. Roessler

Tags

, , , , , , ,

This new blogging challenge, 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks, landed in my lap recently, and it seems that fate wants me to tell you about a man in my husband’s lineage whose name my children were born to.

Christ Roessler signature 1899

Christ. Roessler

I’m a member of a Facebook group called Pennsylvania Genealogy Network and had added my ROESSLER surname to one of their surname files for researchers to find each other, my Roessler line being associated with Allegheny County. I was contacted just yesterday by a fellow group member noting that her mother-in-law was a ROESSLER from the county I had indicated. Fast forward a few back and forths and BINGO! we’re both interested in a couple who began our Roessler family here in the United States. While it appears I have more information document-wise, she is blessed to be closer both in location and in generations to this founding family. This couple was her husband’s great grandparents, as compared to being my husband’s third great grandparents. You can imagine, perhaps, that the stories his family has of the Roessler family do not reach back 4 generations to the days when they lived in Pennsylvania and therefore, this founding couple.

So here is what I know of Christ Roessler. His name is always abbreviated as “Christ.” or “Chr” with the exception of his Muster Rolls, where his name is spelled “Christoph,” and once each as “Christian” and “Christopf.” Even his military headstone says “CHRIST. ROESSLER.” So I just refer to him as Christ. Christ was born 27 Aug 1833 in Baden, Germany (1), and he came to the United States prior to February 1855 (2), but I’ve yet to find any information on his emigration. He married Louisa Mansderver/Mansderfer on either 22 February 1855 by Reverend Zimmerman (2) or 3 March 1855 by Reverend Gilbert (3). In 1907, at the age of 73, Christ noted that at enlistment (1861) he was 5’8″ with light hair and complexion and gray eyes. He enlisted, at the age of 28, as a Private in Company F of the 74th Pennsylvania Infantry on 6 September 1861 in Pittsburgh, and that he was honorably discharged with the whole of his Company at Fort Ethan Allen in Virginia on the 16th September 1864 (1). I know that he received a $12 Pension, under Certificate No. 862566 (1), but two of his records include the number 600.322 (4) (5), so that needs to be further investigated. Christ alleged in 1887 to the Bureau of Pensions that he was wounded whilst in the service “disabled by a gunshot wound in head (scalp wound) recieved at Bull Run, Va Aug 27th, 1862” (4), but a review of his regimental records did not provide evidence of said wound (5).

I am blessed to have been given a bunch of documents that may just comprise the entirety of Christ’s military file, but as they were hand-me-downs, I’m not certain at this time, but I do have a lot of it! I have 4 pages of legal-sized photocopies of his Muster Rolls dating from 31 Dec 1861 to 16 Sep 1864 when he mustered out at Fort Ethan Allen in Virginia. Christ was sent on several recruiting missions back to Pittsburgh while he was in service, as noted on his Muster Rolls (6). Also included is the accounting of his pay, he was last paid 30 Apr 1864, but did not muster out until 16 September 1864. He was due $9.09 on his clothing account since last settlement date of 29 February 1864, he was also due $100 in Bounty, and had a Stoppage on his account for $2.48 “for one Rubber Blanket not paid” (7).

The children of Christ and his wife Louisa are noted in his 2 Pension Questionnaires (2) (3), though their birth dates are inconsistent between the 2 documents, completed when Christ was 64 and 65 years old, also according to the records his wife passed away between the two. Here are their children with both their 1898 (3) and 1899 (2) birth dates, respectively:

Christ Roessler – 22 Aug 1855 / 22 Aug 1855
Henry Roessler – 30 Nov 1856 / 28 Feb 1856
Lizzie Roessler Grine – 7 Sep 1860 / 12 Jun 1860
Caroline Roessler – 30 Oct 1865 / 8 May 1866
Albert C Roessler – 25 Jun 1865 / 25 Jul 1876

As the birth date of Christ (the younger) does not change, I am doubtful Henry was born 6 months after him, so the November 1856 date is more likely for him, and subsequently the September birth for Lizzie. Caroline is a post-war baby, so either date is feasible. Albert Charles’ birth date is definitely closer to the 1876 date, even though it is a large gap, based on his 1880 and 1900 census records.  

The Roesslers were members of the German Evangelical Church of Birmingham, now the Birmingham United Church of Christ, and I have contacted them for more information, and thankfully their records from 1843 – 1977 have been archived at the University of Pittsburgh Archives Service Center, which is on my ToDo List for this year. I’d love to get my hands on the marriage record of Christ and Louisa, and the birth/baptism records of the children.

I’ve found Christ and family in the 1870, 1880, and 1900 census records so far:

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1870

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1870

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1880

Christ Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1880

Albert Charles Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1900

Albert Charles Roessler Household, Pittsburgh, PA 1900

Christ died on 24 Mar 1909 (8), and is buried in what is now known as Birmingham Cemetery in Pittsburgh, PA, though I’ve also heard it referred to as Zimmerman. He has a memorial listed on FindAGrave. A fellow descendant visited his resting place in 2013 with her dad, a great grandson of Christ’s, and is kindly allowing me to share her photos with you, thank you Karen!

Military headstone of Christ Roessler

Military headstone of Christ Roessler

Roessler Family plot at Birmingham Cemetery. Large monument includes Louisa, wife of Christ Roessler, and their son Albert Charles (and wife Marie), military headstone ofChrist to the left. Footstones along the tree line are believed to be a part of this plot as well.

Roessler Family plot at Birmingham Cemetery. Large monument includes Louisa, wife of Christ Roessler, and their son Albert Charles (and wife Marie), military headstone of Christ to the left. Footstones along the tree line are believed to be a part of this plot as well.

So there you are, basically everything I know about Christ. Roessler, the Original Immigrant Ancestor of my husband’s Roessler family. Do you have any suggestions or information that might help me get a fuller picture of Christ or his family? Are you connected to him? Please contact me! My research wishlist for Christ:

          • When did Christ journey to the United States, and from where? Did he travel with any other family?
          • Search the microfilm records of the church for any mention of Christ and his family.
          • Request the full military pension file for Christ to determine if there are any pieces missing from what I was given.
          • Did Christ become a Naturalized Citizen? When? Would he have had to be a Citizen to enlist in the Civil War?
          • Start a Descendants Project for all of the descendants of Christ and Louisa.
  1. “ACT OF FEBRUARY 6, 1907 DECLARATION FOR PENSION,” 23 March 1907.
  2. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions Questionnaire dated 6 January 1899, signed 9 January 1899.
  3. Department of the Interior Bureau of Pensions Questionnaire dated 15 January 1898, signed 6 June 1898.
  4. Department of the Interior Bureau of Pensions letter dated 8 April 1887 requesting records from the War Department regarding an injury suffered during the war by Christ Roessler, Private, Co F 74th PA Inf.
  5. War Department Adjutant General’s Office letter dated 31 May 1887 in response to (4) with service details, no evidence found in records of said wound.
  6. Muster Roll Records of Private Christ Roessler, Co F. 74th PA Inf, dates spanning 31 Dec 1861 – Aug 1864, 4 pages.
  7. Muster Out Account Record, dated after 30 Apr 1864.
  8.  United States Pension Agency, Pensioner Dropped, Christ Roessler, Certificate No. 862.566, died 24 March 1909, dated 25 March 1909.

52 Weeks 52 Ancestors: Challenge Accepted.

Tags

I’ve been feeling awful about my lack of consistency in my own chosen projects. It shouldn’t come as a shock to me, I’ve had a problem with following through for as much of my life as I can imagine I made such attempts to start things. Trust me, my mother can tell you all about my habit of leaving things unfinished.  I have not broken this habit in the first 30+ years of my life, hopefully that won’t be true for my second 30+ years. While the intent is to never really “finish” my genealogical adventures, I do want to be more consistent. I do want to leave a tangible record of my attempts and research for my children and others who might find themselves kin to them in some way.

So, here we are at the dawn of the New Year, and the time of Resolutions is upon us. One of mine is definitely to follow through and be consistent with my blogging. So, in true procrastinator style I’ve been sort of thinking about how exactly to do that for the past 3 days or so… and along comes the lovely Amy Johnson Crow with her golden gift to the tune of “Hallelujah” (in my head it totally went down like that)

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

Used with permission by Amy Jonson Crow.

I think she struck a chord through the genealogy blogging sphere if the comments and the number of folks joining in is any indication.

So here we are friends and family. Me making a commitment to this project. Hopefully, I’ll post more than just that, but still. Baby steps.

I can do this. Won’t you join me?